Guidelines for Moderators of Sessions

Introduce the presenters and yourself. Do not take time for people to introduce themselves (unless the group is so small that it seems awkward not to).

RIGs

Moderators of RIG sessions should do the following:

  1. Read (both) paper(s) that will be discussed during the session prior to the beginning of the meeting (copies are available online on the REA Web site in the 2013 Sessions section). Note commonalities and differences in the papers.
  2. Contact the presenter(s) prior to the meeting and discuss issues such as the order of presentation, personal information that might be useful in introducing the presenter(s), and any special requests for the session.
  3. Introduce the presenter(s) and keep time on each presentation to insure there is adequate time for all presenters.
  4. Open the floor for discussion once the presentation(s) have been completed.
  5. Call the session to a conclusion at the appropriate time and thank those in attendance for their participation!

Colloquia

The moderator of a colloquium session should strive to help the participants get the most from the discussion and help the presenter have their ideas clearly communicated and engaged. A colloquium is intended as an opportunity to “think out loud” with colleagues, to work ideas that are still “in process.” As such the moderator needs to be careful about not having any one person dominate the discussion, and supporting the presenter in getting what they need from the discussion. This should be done as unobtrusively as possible—it is the presenter’s time in the spotlight Specifically moderators should

  1. Review any writing that has been made available in advance (colloquium presentations are not papers). Any such writing would be available in the 2013 Sessions section of our website.
  2. Introduce the presenter(s) and keep time on each presentation to insure there is adequate time for all presenters.
  3. Facilitate the session. Depending on the presenters’ wishes, this role may be minor or significant. It may involve managing unforeseen conflict, time imbalances, etc.

Workshops

The moderator of a workshop session should strive to help the participants get the most from the presentation and help the presenter have their ideas clearly communicated and engaged. This should be done as unobtrusively as possible—it is the presenter’s time in the spotlight not the moderator’s. Specifically moderators should

  1. Review any writing that has been made available in advance (workshop presenters are not required to prepare papers). Any such writing would be available in the 2013 Sessions section of our website.
  2. Introduce the presenter(s) and keep time on each presentation to insure there is adequate time for all presenters.
  3. Facilitate the session. Depending on the presenters’ wishes, this role may be minor or significant. It may involve managing unforeseen conflict, time imbalances, etc.